Getting Over

2020-04-12 (2)

If you know me personally, or if you follow me on Twitter, you know I’m a huge wrestling fan. I don’t get to watch it as much as I’d like these days, but I still follow AEW, NWA, and WWE pretty closely. Mostly, I listen to podcasts and watch highlights. I admire the art so much as a form of storytelling. The character work, when done right, can be even more effective and believable than what we see in movies, on TV, or inside a book.

In the business, there’s a term, “getting over,” which refers to how much a wrestler connects to the audience. Like anything, it’s not an exact science figuring out how to connect. It usually comes from practice, trial and error, and an uncanny ability for listening.

This brings me to something that happened four days ago. I saw wrestler Scott Steiner (aka Big Poppa Pump, aka Big Bad Booty Daddy, aka the genetic freak, aka White Thunder, aka the mathematician) was trending on Twitter. He was a favorite of mine when growing up. He was the type of guy you loved to hate: arrogant, unhinged, and VERY talented in the ring.

He’s also the author of the greatest wrestling promo ever spoken, the literary merit of which is indisputable.

Listen to that. Seriously. Art.

He also owns a Shoney’s. For the uninitiated, Shoney’s is a buffet-style restaurant located mostly in the Southern United States. Its food is about what you’d expect, but due to Steiner’s celebrity status and the unveiling of that glorious billboard, he was trending on Twitter.

Mostly, I tweet about books. Sometimes, I use humor. Sometimes, I shill for myself. Usually, I couldn’t care less about what’s trending, but when I saw a favorite wrestler from the glory days of the sport on the sidebar, I had to take a look. Without a second thought, tweeted that photo along with the following text: “The billboard for the Shoney’s owned by wrestler and esteemed mathematician Scott Steiner. I know where I’m going after this pandemic ends.”

That was it. No hashtags. Didn’t ‘@’ anyone.

And yet…

As of this writing, it has been ‘liked’ 591 times, retweeted 139 times, and it’s inspired 30 replies.

I never get that kind of traction.

Will it translate into book sales? Doubtful. Is it a funny observation? Absolutely.

So, yeah, I ‘got over’ on Twitter this week. Pretty dope.

Like what I do here? Buy me a beer.

I've been blogging a lot more regularly and I intend to continue to do so. If you enjoy my posts or enjoy my books, throw me a buck. You'll get a shoutout in my next post and help me buy frivolous things like beer and Halloween decorations.

$1.00

The Social Cesspool

I’m sporadically posting on Twitter again. I almost returned to Facebook tonight. It’s hard not to see both moves as signs of defeat. I’m giving thoughts on how I can use both platforms in the way I used to enjoy using them. For example, I used to genuinely like interacting with people on a limited basis regarding books and movies that I enjoyed, or books and movies I could discover based on the recommendations of others.

As I began to take my writing career more seriously, using these websites became more and more of a task (with little reward, I might add). On top of that, I found myself getting more and more negative the more I continued to use these platforms (Facebook, in particular). When scrolling either Facebook or Twitter, I found myself feeling one of two things: I was either bored or angry. Neither of these emotions are things I care to feel. While I do take a small amount of pride in my crankiness (hence the name of this website), I don’t consider myself an out and out angry person.

But now, as more of my books are starting to see release, I’m feeling incredibly anxious. How will they do now that I’ve, for all intents and purposes, left the conversation? The publisher of the new edition of my collection made mention that I’m not on Facebook, and it made me feel, I dunno, weird. I’m sure he didn’t mean it in a passive-aggressive way, but still. It made me wonder: am I missing out on potential sales?

The truth? I don’t know. I mean, maybe?

If I return, which I might (despite the statement I made in my initial blog post), I need to do things differently. I’ve considered hiring someone, but frankly, I can’t afford it. I’m thinking the best thing to do is to set an alert on my phone to check both platforms once a week and post something, but then ignore the sites the remaining six days. It seems to make the most sense for me, but I don’t know. We’ll see.

Does anyone have thoughts on this? If so, I’d love to hear them.